WHERE DO THE DEMOCRATS’ IDEAS COME FROM?

Without equivocation, the Democratic Party has always stood for a "progressive income tax" whereby the more you earn, the greater percentage you pay.

And the Democrats have historicallymade a continuous and sustained effort at trying to ensurethat the inheritances of those who leave behind even a relatively modest estate will face taxes.

Democrats have claimed to want to ‘protect' the public from unfair business practices, pollution, global warming, unsafe foods and pharmaceuticals, gunsand anything else they could regulate. The regulatory labyrinth at the local, state and federal levels employs millions of people at a cost of tens of billions of dollars and wreaks havoc on entrepreneurship in this country while solving almost no problems whatsoever.

The Democrats have been known for huge inflationarypublic works ‘pork barrel",spending projects and "make work” job creation.

The question should be asked: From where do Democrats draw the philosophical and historical precedents for their world views?

The answer will not be pleasant. It is disturbing: The Democrats draw their concept of statecraft from the worst forms of government known to human history… socialism and fascism.

This is not mindless rhetoric. The examples are easy to find in reputable historical sources.

Take for example a pamphlet written by Karl Marx in 1848 known as the Communist Manifesto. In listing the plans Marx had for a socialist society, he specifically mentioned both the progressive income tax and the abolition of all rights of inheritance. Marx knew that in order to have his desired classless society with massive armies of virtually enslaved workers and farmers, he would have to make it difficult for families to accumulate private wealth. And he also specifically mentioned that ‘contradictions' between the wealthy and the rest of society would have to be exacerbated for a real class struggle and ultimately a socialist revolution to occur.

The Democrats propose doing precisely what Marx would do. By taxing income, property and inheritance, they make the gap between those who struggle to make ends meet and those higher up on the economic scale that much wider. While the wealthy have legions of slick lawyers and accountants to avoid inheritance taxes, the rest of us don't. The ultimate goal is to prevent a meaningful accessto the benefits of a dynamic economy by all but a well-connected or privileged elite. We see this in

America now with the income gap widening

Marx also advocated a centralization of credit in a national bank. In our Federal Reserve System, all member banks are influenced by the interest rates set by the Federal Reserve system, and the banks are permitted to extend more and more credit each year , putting more dollars into circulation. This of course has made the dollar worth less and less each year, but it gets worse.

Our dollar is backed up by nothing, including whatever is left in

Fort

Knox. There is no gold and there is no silver that stands behind any of our currency (Federal Reserve Notes), just the good will of Congress. That is just plain scary. The government can just print up as much money as it needs to satisfy the whims of big spenders in Congress while rest of us are ravaged by inflation

Who do we have to thank for the Federal Reserve System ? The same president who gave us the federal income tax, Democrat Woodrow Wilson.

Dictators are not the kind of people who are likely to allow the ‘invisible hand" of free markets to guide the economy. They are ‘economic interventionists' who use the power of the state to order businessmen and often consumers as well to do commerce according to the arbitrary rules of the state.

In

Italy in the nineteen thirties the effects of the depression were badly felt by the public. The dictator of that nation, Benito Mussolini, subscribed to a philosophy that glorified the state as the expression of all human needs and desires. Thus the state could, in the fascist way of doing things, order the individual to do what the state wants, control the economy for the state benefit and in so doing, in their rather warped view, thus best serve the public.

This led to the formation of huge industrial and agriculturalarmies for the purpose of land reclamation and public works. Mussolini also imposed strict wage and price controls.

From

Washington,

D.C. Democratic president Franklin D. Roosevelt looked to

Rome with great admiration. The Roosevelt New Deal studiously copied Mussolini and began such institutions as Civilian Conservation Corps, the Civil Works Administration and the National Industry Recovery Act. Roosevelt‘s Agriculture Department even litigated against farmers who grew too much wheat for their own personal use! (1)

The National Industry Recovery Act (2)immediately became a regulatory nightmare. The Act legalized monopolies, proscribed approximately 4500 business practices and set up local, regional and national boards for various code enforcements. Its administrative code book was over 10,000 pages long. Eventually the United States Supreme Court had the good sense to declare this portion of

Roosevelt's frolic with economic fascism unconstitutional and the nonsense stopped.

Roosevelt emulated Mussolini with wage and price controls by establishing an office of

" Economic Stabilization." Americans were told to call in a hotline if a merchant sold an item at an illegal price. Americans had to turn in their gold and accept an increasingly inflated paper money.(3) Wages were set by industrial cartels, and limits on what could be produced were enforced by law under direction of the industrial cartels.

Mussolini and Roosevelt, well before

Italy began its all-fated alliance with

Germany and adopted the latter's racial policies) exchanged a series of mutually flattering letters. Margarita Sarffati, a Fascist party founder , art critic and philosopher who was quite close to the Italian dictator, visited Washington and acted as Mussolini's unofficial goodwill ambassador to the New Deal. Her warm relationship with the Roosevelt Administration is copiously documented in Il Duce's Other Woman, (Cannastaro and Sullivan, 1993) a fascinating account of love, politics and betrayal.

While much of the

Roosevelt economic dictatorship ended, a major legacy of his New Deal survives.

Roosevelt'sSecurities and Exchange Commission has lived to tormentand intimidateAmerican entrepreneurs for decades. It hasmade the cost of capital formation prohibitive, meaning numerous new technologies and ideas never come to market and countless new jobs are never created. Conveniently, the regulatory morass its red tape imposes protects entrenched businesses from the emergence of less capitalized rivals. (4)

If any doubt lingers as to where Democrats get their ideas, author Jay Simkin should be given the last word. He is the author of Lethal Laws, which hasas its premisethe theory that every major genocide, as well other massacres, of the past one hundred years has been the result of gun control laws. He points to the Ottoman Turks (who massacred Armenians), the Nazis, Stalin and Pol Pot as examples of dictatorshipswhose regimes conducted the worst kinds of human rights abuses and mass murders as their governments greatly restricted gun ownership.

Today we witness legions of Democratic politicians, as well some ill-advised Republicans, promoting one gun confiscation measure after another. As they disarm the American people, they will enable our enemies, whether they are criminal gangs, a future movement of totalitarian extremists or a government that loses its moral compass and begins to attack or persecute large numbers of its own citizens.

Nancy Pelosi, Ted Kennedy and Hillary Clinton now, for all practical purposes,carry the mantle of the Democratic Party leadership. They have given us no reason to trust their competency, motives or judgment. As they lead their party into the future, I recall the approximatewords ofthe late ex-radical Jerry Rubin.

" If fascism comes to

America it won't be with storm troopers and swastikas. It will be through the Kennedy liberals."

Notes:

1. See Wickard v Filburn 317 US 111 (1942)

2. 15

US Code Section 707(a)

3. Executive Order 6102

4. See Roberta Karmel "Regulation By Prosecution" (1982) Former SEC Commission writes dispassionate expose of SEC's adversarial role towards business.

The author is Chairman of the Hull Republican Town Committee. He practices law in

Newton,

Massachusetts.

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